3 of My Failures As a Leader

Failure-Is-Not-Final1

I have always aspired to be a great leader. Who would really dream of being mediocre? The problem with leading is this: You can fail.

Failure is a subject that has been written about countless times, so I will not attempt that here. However, I did want to share three areas in which I have "failed successfully".

1. The Lone Ranger

I have the tendency to say things like this:

I can get it done better than someone else. I am more creative, quicker in work procedures, and know exactly what I want in the outcome. I will just do it myself.

"BY MYSELF" is exactly where I ended up in the failed project. The arrogance of the statement above is a sure death to a dream and ultimately death to the actual project.

2. This is a great idea

I have a lot of great ideas. But I also have a lot of forgettable ideas. Let me say it bluntly: I've had a lot of stupid ideas that only I thought were great. It is essential to your success that you surround yourself with others who will bring a lot of reality into your dreamy idea.

3. I trust you

These three words have been spoken as a means to comfort the one speaking those words. Here is a confession to you: If I verbalize my trust in you, it is probably because I DO NOT TRUST YOU. So, I lie. The lie is not to you per say - it is to myself.

This seems to be a trend in a lot people that I know. We say things out loud to try to convince ourselves of what we have spoken. I am happy to say that I have ended this trend in my life. I simply choose to trust those around me or not connect at all.

The fact is this: Trust is something you do, not something you say.

Find people that you can trust - not because you "feel it" but because they have a reputation for being trusted.

I have made many adjustments in my heart and mind over the past two years. Learning to trust has been difficult. It has also shown me ways in which to gain and give trust to others and experience loyalty as a team.

Here are a few ways to ensure loyalty with others: 1. Respect their gifting and services by compensating them well. 2. Be transparent with those around you. Allow them to see your humanity. 3. Promote their services to others.

Question: What are some ways in which you have learned from your failures as a leader?

 

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Posted on May 20, 2011 and filed under Leading.